Agenda

CONFERENCE AGENDA

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Tuesday, October 23rd, 2018

9:00

11:00

Conference Registration

Blue Mountain Conference Centre

11:00

11:15

Welcome Remarks

11:15

12:00

Keynote Address: Leadership Resiliency
Randy Taylor, Taylormade Leadership Media

12:00

13:00

Welcome Lunch and Networking

Act Without Thinking

Dan Walmsely, Facilitator/Coach
KEYS Job Centre

Trauma Informed Counselling: Working with Adverse Childhood Experience Survivors

CEE Centre for Young Black Professionals

Virtual Reality: The Future Tools for Career Practitioners

Susan Watts, Employment + Education Centre,
Harrison Olajos, CEO of UP360,
Dr. Karen Caldwell, CEO of Caldwell Training and Development

1:00

3:00

The Secret to Retention in YJC

Noel Creighton, Ashley Flett,
Farrah Glabb & Amber Tremblay
Job Gym – John Howard Society of Niagara

Scalable and Sustainable: Building a Provincial Tourism
Workforce Innovation Network to Address Skills Shortages

Adam Morrison, OTEC
Gladys Okine, First Work
Gillian Watters, KEYS Job Centre

Thriving in the New World of Work: Developing Young People through Work Integrated Learning

Madeleine Barker, RBC 

Risk Management for Nonprofits, Adele Read, The Co-operators
Executive Track

3:00

3:15

Break

Decent Work for Women in Nonprofit

Pamela Uppal
Ontario Nonprofit Network

Trauma Triggered at Work? Tools To Explore

CEE Centre for Young Black Professionals

Engage Clients with eLearning – Getting Started

Christine Brown-Read
BBMD Consulting Inc.

3:15

4:45

What Problems Do You Want to Solve? Preparing Youth for Jobs that Don’t Exist Yet

JP Michel
SparkPath

The AliGN Network: Aiding Recruitment Practices to Find Meaningful Employment

Mark Patterson, Magnet
Adam Morrison, OTEC

Youth Wellness Hubs Ontario: Implementing & Evaluating a One-Stop-Shop Model of Service Delivery to Improve Youth Mental Health

Dr. Joanna Henderson
Executive Director of Youth Wellness Hubs Ontario

First Work’s Annual General Meeting

4:45

7:30

Professional Headshots – “LinkedIn” Photoshoot

6:00

9:00

DINNER
7:30 – 8:15 Dinner Keynote Address: Intergenerational Communication
Bailey Parnell, SkillsCamp Soft Skills Training

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End

Wednesday, October 24th, 2018

6:30

7:30

Yoga & Meditation

7:30

9:00

Breakfast

9:00

10:00

Youth Panel Plenary: Challenges, Successes & Opportunities

10:00

10:15

Break

Cannabis in the Workplace

Lawrence D. Blake
Canadian Mental Health Association

Indigenous Youth Employment Success: From Employability to Employed

Shari St. Peter
Niagara Peninsula Aboriginal Area Management Board

The Future of Self – Employment: How to Prepare Youth for the Next 30 Years

Nancy Wilson
Canadian Women’s Chamber of Commerce

10:15

12:00

Thrive in the Workplace

Kelly Schafer
Career Education Council

Transforming Attitudes and Actions: How Employers Can Create Youth Engaging Workplace Cultures

Grace Dagres
Dale Carnegie Training

Youth Programs Supporting Transitions into the Workforce

Trudy Button
The Ontario Centre for Workforce Innovation

A New View of Leadership Belinda Clemmensen, Women’ s Leadership Intensive

Executive Track

12:00

1:00

Lunch

1:00

1:45

Keynote Address: Bridging The Gap
Kelly Lovell, Lovell Corporation

Inclusion and Wellness in the Workplace

Tamara Balan & Leslie Domenico
CivicAction

Motivational Interviewing Skills for Practitioners and Client Success

Lisa Ambaye
Rideau-Ottawa Valley Learning Network

Opportunities for Youth Workforce Development in the Growing Early Learning and Child Care Sector

Glory Ressler
Mothercraft

2:00

3:30

Marketing Your Clients: The Business Case for Hiring People with a Disability

Jeannette Campbell
Ontario Disability Employment Network

Impact and Growth of Social Enterprise

Trudy Button
The Ontario Centre for Workforce Innovation

Digital Marketing – Understanding the Employment Market

Thomas Chui & Sath Ly from
ClickHelp

Board Governance & Leadership Albert Brulé, Impact Consulting by Pillar Nonprofit Network

Executive Track

3:30

6:00

Tech & Trades Presentation Showcase
Bill Couchie, Skills Ontario
Susan Watts, Employment & Education Centre

*Attend and Receive a Ticket to the Ice Cream Truck*

6:00

9:00

30th Anniversary Dinner & Award Ceremony

Board of Director’s Address
Special Entertainment

Download theme dinner invite

Start

End

Thursday, October 25th, 2018

6:30

7:30

Yoga & Meditation

7:30

8:30

Breakfast

8:30

9:00

Keynote Address:

Toward a Pathways Model to Enable Canada’s Labour Transition

Matthias Oschinski, Director, Innovation Economics, MaRS Discovery District

Navigating the Future of Work Through Pathways

Melissa Smith & Malavika Kumaran
MaRS Discovery District

Game-bling: When Gaming Meets Gambling and the Implications for Employment Service Providers

Mina Hazar & Adela Colhon
YMCA of Greater Toronto

Job Search Zombies

Dan Walmsely
Facilitator/Coach KEYS Job Centre

9:00

10:15

Exploring Best Practices for The Recognition of International Education

Jodi Tingling
World Education Services

National Youth Employment Strategy Consultations
with ESDC and First Work– Part 1

Employment and Social Development Canada

First Work

Social Enterprise: Turning Passion into Profit
Nick van der Velde and Albert Brulé, Impact Consulting by Pillar Nonprofit Network

Executive Track

10:15

10:30

Break

More than a Potluck: Gaining Cultural Competence in the Workplace

Dr. Andrew Campbell
University of Toronto

Leveraging Employment Partnerships & Networks

Craig Milson
City of Toronto

Administrative Data Sharing

Jonathan McPhedran Waitzer
Powered by Data

10:30

11:45

Aspiring Youth Leadership

Christopher Duff
Inspired Initiatives

National Youth Employment Strategy Consultations with ESDC and First Work Part 2

Employment and Social Development Canada and First Work

Personal Transformation: Tapping into Your Client’s Resourcefulness and Resilience During Job Search

Barb Rosen Schreiber
Meena Kaila-Gambhir
Bonnie Grogan
International Coaching Federation

Leadership & Empathy
Nick van der Velde, Impact Consulting by Pillar Nonprofit Network

Executive Track

11:45

12:30

Closing Remarks
Lunch and Conference Wrap-up

In this session participants will discover strategies for retaining youth in group based employment programs. KEYS Job Centre has been extremely successful at keeping its youth engaged throughout and ensuring they are there to move on to the next phase. Important basics will be discussed including: how best to engage youth, how to keep them engaged, how to have a strong, successful group learning experience.

In “Working with Adverse Childhood Experience Survivors”, the presentors will (re)introduce the research and knowledge around Adverse Childhood effects. We will examine the importance of this research, how it affects a significant percentage of the service population and how these effects impact their interaction with the systems. Presentors will also aspire to build capacity among conference attendees regarding best practices for working with survivors.

Virtual Reality: The Future Tools for Career Practitioners Making career decisions is tough, especially with all the choices out there. Career Labs, our virtual reality (VR) tool, puts job seekers in the driver’s seat, to not only get tailored job information, but to see, hear and experience the job itself ….without ever leaving the Career Coach’s office. Career savvy decision making has never been so hands on or easy.

Struggling to retain participants in your Youth Job Connection program?
Come to this interactive session to find out how we get our youth to stay and come back! In this workshop we will talk about, relationship building, special events for youth, youth engagement and what we do different to make our youth stay.You will leave this session with new and innovative ideas to get your client’s engaged and wanting more.

In response to labour and skills shortages, OTEC, and a network of partners including the Ontario Restaurant Hotel and Motel Association (ORHMA), Restaurants Canada, Magnet, First Work, Regional Tourism Organizations and leading employment and training partners like KEYS Job Centre, have launched a provincial sector-based workforce development strategy. The model aligns sectoral and community priorities through collaborative strategic planning and partnership development between industry and employment services organizations. The network leverages an online psychometric fit assessment and candidate referral management system called ALiGN, which was developed with Magnet, to provide a consistent technology infrastructure across the network as it grows. After launching in 4 regions in 2017, the network has now grown to 10 cities and over 40 partners.

This session will review the factors that informed the model’s design. It will share key findings from the field research undertaken in each city as well as interim evaluation results of the technology platform. Finally, it will identify the components and governance structures that give the network resilience and explore how community, regional and sector based partners can get involved and leverage the network’s resources.

This workshop will help you better understand the changing landscape of skills and how these changes are impacting young people’s transition from school to work. We will explore the importance of work integrated learning and share a toolkit, based on RBC’s research and expertise, that will help employers design great early career experiences. Key topics include:

1. Data driven insights on young people’s school to work transitions and how skills are changing in the new world of work
2. How well-designed work integrated learning experiences smooth transitions for young people and help achieve talent and business objectives
3. Key design elements in great experiences for young people

What are the risk management priorities for your organization? This presentation will take you through insurance 101 principles and discuss specialized insurance needs for non-profit organizations, their directors, officers, employees and volunteers.

We will review property and commercial general liability insurance and the critical areas that many non-profits should consider. The essentials of a risk management process will be discussed and how such tools can help you identify your unique needs based on the work you do in your communities.

Come and learn about your responsibilities, liabilities and coverage that will keep your non-profit organization safe, functional and thriving.

The nonprofit sector’s distinctive features, challenges, and trends significantly impact its labour force, one that consists of 80% women workers. However, we know very little about how women are faring in the sector. How do challenges women face in the broader labour market particularly manifest and impact different women working in the sector (e.g., the gender wage gap, ‘glass ceilings’, and leaky leadership pipelines)? Given the critical intersections between labour, the nonprofit sector, and women, ONN is exploring these questions by applying an intersectional gender lens to its decent work movement. In this workshop, we will engage the audience in thinking about what decent work for women looks like. We will present our findings on women’s employment experiences in Ontario’s nonprofit sector from our research activities and work with the audience to think about how strategies at the organizational, network and policy levels can be developed and implemented for change.

The presenters both work in a profession that triggers their trauma – directly and with sustained impact – as they support fellow survivors and sometime perpetrators to transition to meaningful career pathways. The question explored in this session are ones often posed to them: is your profession more harmful or helpful to your wellbeing? Are your building or breaking your resilience? What about breakthroughs and burnout? The presenters share their perspectives and the practices they employ.

Millennials are often referred to as “Digital Natives”, having grown up with technology at their fingertips. Recent research suggests that millennials embrace technology in their learning experience. In fact, one study (1) found students preferred web‐based platforms to source educational information, with 78% using YouTube as their primary source of video. In Employment Services, transferring some of your Instructor-Led Training (ILT) to eLearning is a great way to capture your learners’ attention and meet their learning needs. ELearning will free up your finite staff resources so they can deliver other valuable services. It doesn’t need to be complicated and expensive to be effective. During this session you will learn some of the eLearning industry’s best practices to help you get started.

To prepare youth for the future of work, we need to move them away from considering only the jobs and careers available to them, and shift their attention to the problems and opportunities that exist in the world. This simple shift will unlock new opportunities, a different way to see the world and a powerful approach to preparing for success.

This shift is being implemented in hundreds of schools across North America through the Challenge Method, a new mindset for career development. The Challenge Method is different than traditional career development as it helps clients connect with their deeper purpose by allowing them to choose problems they want to solve.

Join this session to learn about a set of tools and exercises that can help you guide students and job seekers to identify, understand and choose big problems they want to solve. Discover 30 challenges and opportunities that will define the future of work for the next 30 years. Interactive session with case studies and resources.

An age-old issue for people seeking employment comes from the fact that to gain employment requires employment history. For youth and newcomers with no Canadian experience, this easily becomes one of the greatest barriers to securing meaningful employment. While employers recognize this challenge, they are tempted by the fact that in the absence of other information, employment history becomes the best predictor of an employee’s potential for success. While technology has transformed almost every aspect of recruitment, it has yet to address this issue.

The ALiGN Network Model was developed to address this ongoing challenge. It is a technology supported employment tool and model, developed in partnership with Magnet at Ryerson University, OTEC and WhoPlusYou. The model integrates an online psychometric tool that objectively assess job seekers’ personality attributes in relation to specific jobs. Employment service providers are provided with results and specific jobs best suited for their clients. Employers can then hire candidates with a demonstrated fit for a specific role, without the need for screening based on previous experience. The results also inform the job seeker about the job roles that they have an aptitude for, training supports that will help them achieve their goals and ultimately meaningful employment. The ALiGN Network Model was initially built to help vulnerable youth who lacked formal education and experience and has now Magnet Mark Patterson 416.500.2054 e: m2patter@ryerson.ca expanded to serve vulnerable newcomers and refugees, as well as higher skilled individuals who may lack “Canadian experience”. Participants in this workshop will learn about this model and how major companies are currently using ALiGN to address their HR needs.

Participants will learn about Youth Wellness Hubs Ontario (YWHO), an initiative to develop, implement and evaluate integrated services for youth aged 12 to 25 years in ten diverse communities across Ontario. Services offered through hubs include mental health, substance use, employment, primary care, housing supports and other community and social services. The model of service delivery emphasizes easy and timely access to high quality services, delivered using youth-centred, evidence-based (or evidence-generating) approaches and in youth-friendly locations. Meeting the needs of highly vulnerable youth who are not engaged in education, employment or training are a priority, as is aligning with and leveraging other investments in the various service systems in the Ontario youth space. This model has been co-created with youth and the valuable role of meaningful employment has been emphasized. These issues will be explored.

This session is meant to orient employers and employees to Cannabis in the workplace, and how to effectively accommodate an individual who may be struggling with a substance use concern. It will cover current legislation, best practices, and emerging research in the field. Participants will walk away with some tools that they can bring to their worksites and businesses.

This session will focus on the continuum of training to employment in relation to the unique needs and experiences of urban Indigenous youth. The speaker will identify the steps to employability and employment that frame the work that is done by NPAAMB. She will showcase NPAAMB programs in particular which demonstrate a holistic approach to training including: Oya:na lifeskills program; Building Futures/ Habitat for Humanity training program; Journey to Success Essential Skills program. She will close with summarizing 4 key areas that NPAAMB is working on to ensure long term impact and youth attachment to the labour market: 1. Employability skills building as critical to technical training completion 2. The Invaluable need for coaches and mentors in training 3. Experiential learning opportunities are a must 4. Evaluation and Reflection- Is what we are doing working?

The percentage of self-employed Canadians is projected to increase from 15% to 45% by 2020. Rapid developments in technology, massive demographic shifts, and the rise of the gig economy will change the landscape of work over the next thirty years. While self-employment used to be an alternative to traditional employment, young people are likely to experience both (often simultaneously) during their careers. What new skills are required to accommodate the changes in career and work options? What resources exist (or should exist) to support the increase in self-employment?

Thrive in the Workplace is an innovative workplace wellness initiative designed to build the capacity of young workers to manage workplace stress in front-line customer service positions. This project provides support to ensure that the large number of youth entering the workforce in frontline customer service or client service positions are equipped with information and tools to deal with sector-specific stress and workplace challenges. This presentation will provide practitioners, managers, service providers and executive directors with the knowledge, skills, and resources they need to support the mental health and well-being of young workers. Improving this organizational capability works to build the baseline skillset of young workers, improve communication, productivity, team morale, and reduce absenteeism.

Driving a culture that engages employees is a critical element for success and our fundamental responsibility as leaders. Join us for an opportunity to learn more, reflect and identify ways to enhance your own corporate culture.

This is an opportunity to learn more, reflect and identify ways to enhance our own corporate culture so that it engages and retains their employees. Understanding what drives employees through corporate culture is also fundamental in ensuring that we are building a highly skilled workforce. We can better identify, nurture and match potential for those youth entering the workforce so that they feel like they are a part of the success of the organization through training, strong customer focus, providing clear strategy and goals and encouraging strong relationships between employees and their managers.

Join Trudy Button from the Ontario Centre for Workforce Innovation as she discusses OCWI’s youth-focused projects and partnerships, their positive impact on participants, the results and success stories, and how you can adopt these practices to assist the youth you work with. In Ontario, many youth (ages 15-24) experience chronic challenges and barriers to entering the workforce. There is a clear need for employment service programs and approaches that are geared specifically toward helping youth transition into the workforce. The challenge is identifying and implementing the right approaches for alleviating some of these pressures. While there might not be one ‘right’ model for best supporting youth employment, there are service providers throughout Ontario delivering innovative, successful, and scalable youth-oriented services. *

It’s time for a new conversation about leadership. Most of what’s been written and adopted in leadership comes from the corporate environment where individualism and profit are fundamental drivers. That model doesn’t directly translate to organizations with different missions, visions and values, and trying to work within a one-size-fits-all has been limiting our creativity.

In this interactive presentation, we bring the research about the barriers and opportunities, inspire you to consider new concepts and models, and facilitate a discussion about the impact and the potential for positive change. Come and start building a better fit for the leaders of your organization, today and for the future.

First steps to creating inclusive and supportive workplaces

Did you know there are more than 300,000 youth in Ontario between 15-29 not in employment, education or training? And that 50% of the Toronto region’s workforce has experienced a mental health issue? At the same time, 70% of employers say they need help finding applicants to fill entry-level roles and 42% want to create a more mental health supportive workplace but don’t have the tools.

During this interactive session CivicAction will introduce you to HireNext and MindsMatter, two tools that can help organizations close these gaps and create more inclusive and supportive work environments. The session will also set the stage for table discussions where attendees will exchange peer ideas, experiences and insights on what can be done to support inclusive hiring practices and create a mental health supportive workplace.

The workshop provides the guiding principles, strategies and skills of Motivational Interviewing to elicit and strengthen a client’s own motivations for change. Using an experiential model of learning, participants will explore Motivational Interviewing through practice, simulations and feedback.

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a collaborative, person-centred approach to eliciting and strengthening a person’s motivation for change. MI explores and resolves ambivalence and supports change in a way that is congruent with a person’s own values, beliefs and wishes. MI is an evidence-based practice, commonly used in assisting individuals with significant challenges.

Incorporating the spirit of MI and the techniques in a Social Service context are expected to:

• generate more appropriate goals, strategies and outcomes based on the client’s individual situation
• witness significant changes in the Practitioner’s style after using MI strategies, resulting in clients that will feel more included in the conversation with greater input into their own pathway
• increase in the motivation and ownership of the client’s learning or employment pathway and it is anticipated that this would likely lead to increases in retention

The early learning and child care sector is expanding and there is a current and anticipated demand for both entry level and accredited workers in a variety of positions and workplace settings.

In recognition of this need, the provincial government recently released a report outlining its commitment to workforce development (Growing Together, Ontario’s Early Years and Child Care Workforce Strategy) which outlines increasing recruitment as one of the 5 key action areas.

However, the sector is experiencing staffing shortages across the province and challenges in recruiting new workers. It is also challenging to understand in terms of employment entry points, educational requirements and career pathways.

This interactive session will provide an opportunity to learn about how to accelerate youth involvement in early learning and child care opportunities, including the education and employment pathways currently available and the basic requirements for good youth/employer fit.

This session is designed for front line staff who support people with disabilities to secure competitive employment. In this session you will learn the Business Case for hiring people with disabilities and be ready to apply this asset and business focused approach to your practice. There will be experiential activities in this session and you will have take-away skills to apply right away. Be ready to participate and approach job development in a non-charity selling way!

The 3 Critical Mistakes Employment Agencies Make With Digital Communications. This session speaks to the misperception and practices of agencies that all marketing should be curated equally. Peak results are found in recognizing that each platform requires a specific tailored solution for maximum effect. In this session, you'll learn 3 critical mistakes employment agencies make; 1) Improper Infrastructure 2) Poor Choice of Platform 3) Mixed Messaging on Social Media

Based on Pillar Nonprofit Network’s long-running “All About Boards” program, this workshop reveals the key ingredients for a high-performing board focused on strategy, innovation, diversity and accountability.
Topics will include:

Join this interactive exhibition brought to us by Skills Ontario and Employment + Education Centre.

This highly interactive and engaging exhibition will feature seven different skill trades relay competitions presented by Skills Ontario as well as the innovative Virtual Reality Career Labs presented by Employment + Education Centre. Check out this virtual reality tool that can put job seekers in the driver’s seat to see, hear and experience the job itself ….without ever leaving the Career Coach’s office.

Don’t miss out on this rare experience to sample skill trades opportunities and play with technology that will help you better prepare your youth for future employment.

This workshop will focus on how our pathway model can help reduce labour market barriers and frictions and so increase employment opportunities for youth.

It’s imperative for employment programs to consider incorporating screening tools for identifying problem gambling to determine the level of support required and be able to provide advice and guidance to prevent gambling from developing into a problem. This workshop provides awareness training to help professionals working in employment programs, youth workers, social workers, etc. with tools and resources to identify and assist individuals engaged with harmful gambling. In order to do so it explores the impact of technology on the gambling market and the blurred lines between gaming and gambling: e-sports, skin betting, daily fantasy sports, social gaming, freemium games, gambling-like activities in video games, virtual reality, virtual currencies, etc. as well as the risk and the implications for employment service providers. Also, this presentation increases the awareness of the link between problem gambling and other related conditions (e.g., mental illness, substance use disorder) among service providers working with vulnerable populations.

A workshop for front line practitioners and managers, focused on how to cure the unmotivated youth i.e. Job Search Zombie. An unmotivated client is doomed to wander like a Zombie. You will answer these questions using experiential and play based learning activities: 1. What is motivation? 2. Why is motivation essential? 3. Where does motivation come from? 4. What leads to Job Search Zombie infection? 5. How do I cure a Zombie? 6. How do I prevent future Job Search Zombie outbreaks? Participants will leave prepared to motivate themselves and to cure their next Zombie.

With the Government of Canada’s plan to settle nearly one million immigrants by 2020, practitioners require information and resources to help internationally educated professionals in the recognition of their academic credentials. This session will provide career practitioners with guidance on how to help internationally educated professionals best utilize and market their education for the purposes of seeking employment opportunities, furthering their education, and re-licensing within their field. Further recommendations into best practices in credential recognition will be explored to help support internationally educated professionals pursue their careers in Canada.

Interested in speaking directly to the Federal Government about youth employment strategies? Want to learn more about the review of the current Youth Employment Strategy? Want to help guide and influence new youth workforce development initiatives led by First Work? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you should join First Work and Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) as we facilitate a learning and feedback discussion that will shape future action plans and strategic directions.

During this session you will learn about the Council for Youth Prosperity, a signature initiative of First Work, and the modernization of the Youth Employment Strategy. The workshop will include a diversity of stakeholders sharing input, expertise and experiences that will directly influence strategy development.
Bring your best thinking and share your effective practices related to program design, collaborative partnerships and performance metrics!

The discussion will be divided into two parts:

1. Program design and funding structures
2. Performance measurement

Social enterprise is a burgeoning sector that combines the ingenuity and innovation of start-ups with the business savvy of sustainable business -- all with the ultimate objective of creating positive social change.

Whether you are striving to generate additional revenue to support your agency’s mission, or looking at the potential of social entrepreneurship to provide meaningful work opportunities that can help youth lead productive and fulfilling lives, this workshop will outline how to design, implement and scale social enterprise according to desired community impact and core values.

Using reflective and reflexive lenses and a process of learning and unlearning, participants will engage in courageous conversations to foster and encourage individual and system growth towards cultural competence. In this session, participants will have the opportunity to examine how actions at the lower levels of the continuum perpetuate a continuous cycle of oppression, while those actions and intentions focused at the higher level of the continuum create opportunities for Equity, Inclusion, Access and Liberation.

Leveraging Employment Partnerships & Networks

This session will explore how youth employment service providers and the City of Toronto are working together to better serve youth who are looking for work, and employers who are looking to hire. The City of Toronto, has developed impactful community networks over the past 10 years and the impact of these networks have led to outcomes impacting the City's most vulnerable youth. This discussion will focus on three of these tables; Employment Connections (youth on probation &/or parole) and Work Connections (youth leaving high school and not returning to education) and the Toronto Youth Partnership for Employment (case management for multi-barriered youth looking for careers). These community networks highlight the specific support each partner can provide as well as pathways to support for youth, reducing the time it takes to build trust with youth and adding options for employment and retention. This session will explore the ways in which collaborative approaches can better support vulnerable youth to find jobs – and to keep them. The session will also explore how collaborative approaches provide streamlined access to talent for employer partners.

Last year, over 7,000 publications included the phrase "data is the new oil". Increased access to this resource could allow nonprofits to better integrate services and track outcomes, while also advocating more effectively to the address the root causes of social issues. Much of the data that could enable these changes is held by government, and currently unavailable to the nonprofit sector. Unlocking these opportunities will require changes to policies that shape what data is collected and shared, with whom, and under what conditions - and of course, such changes involve both benefits and risks! First Work and Powered by Data are working together as part of a coalition of 50+ civil society groups to develop a policy agenda around this issue. This interactive session will present the initial findings of our coalition's research and consultation process, and invite participants to help shape policy recommendations on the future of data sharing in Ontario.

The ways in which youth engage in the economy is vastly different and constantly evolving from the ways that our sector was designed to support them. As a youth advocate and trailblazer in the areas of innovation and community development, Chris Duff will share insights into the dynamic environments that youth are creating and striving within and how our sector and its systems can become agile enough to meet their emerging needs.

Interested in speaking directly to the Federal Government about youth employment strategies? Want to learn more about the review of the current Youth Employment Strategy? Want to help guide and influence new youth workforce development initiatives led by First Work? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you should join First Work and Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) as we facilitate a learning and feedback discussion that will shape future action plans and strategic directions.

During this session you will learn about the Council for Youth Prosperity, a signature initiative of First Work, and the modernization of the Youth Employment Strategy. The workshop will include a diversity of stakeholders sharing input, expertise and experiences that will directly influence strategy development.
Bring your best thinking and share your effective practices related to program design, collaborative partnerships and performance metrics!
The discussion will be divided into two parts:

1. Program design and funding structures
2. Performance measurement

The journey of job search can be more than just about finding a job. For clients, it can be about a journey of personal transformation where the practitioner helps clients to tap into their own resourcefulness and resilience by taking a coach approach. Presenters will identify skills that can be integrated into sessions with your client through their job search process, demonstrating specifically how these skills can be used in the intake session and providing an opportunity for participants to practice using these skills in the workshop. Participants will walk away with tangible takeaways that can be used immediately with their clients.

In order to be an empathic leader, you must be able to connect on an individual and emotional level with employees. But how do you do it? In this session, Nick van der Velde will introduce you to one such tool – the Empathy Walk – a simple yet powerful approach to building trust and empathy that you can learn, practice and bring back to your organization to stimulate enhanced employee engagement, greater commitment, and increased job satisfaction. Be sure to wear your walking shoes!